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Poachers capture eagle and leave him tied to pole
He needed someone to help him.
Rachel Shapiro
09.21.21

Even if a species is legally protected, this unfortunately can’t always protect them from uncaring humans. An eagle in Liberia is a good example of this.

This poor crowned eagle was captured from the forest by poachers and tied up far away from home.

Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary
Source:
Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary

This crowned eagle was captured from the forest and tied up by ropes.

He was unable to fly away to safety, so he was extremely unhappy. The capturers brought the bird to a garage in Monrovia, Liberia, to sell him.

A forestry officer who was out of uniform happened to be walking by at just that moment, and he was able to help the poor creature. The man pretended he wanted to buy the bird, and he organized a setup with the sellers.

Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary
Source:
Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary

Meanwhile, the officer called the Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary. Other officers came to arrest the men who were selling the eagle.

“The officer told the men he wanted to buy it and directed them to where he’d meet them with the money,” Luke Brannon, the manager of the sanctuary, told The Dodo. “He rang ahead and organized for officers to arrest them.”

Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary
Source:
Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary

The men tried to avoid the charges by claiming they had found the bird on the side of the road.

They insisted that they thought it was an owl and that it had not been captured. The evidence, however, told a different story.

The eagle’s legs had been tied together, and he had been wrapped in a canvas. This was proof enough that the bird had been smuggled. The men were taken away, while the eagle was brought to the sanctuary for treatment.

Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary
Source:
Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary

Fortunately, the only injury the bird had sustained was in one of his eyes.

“Upon health checking when we got back, it was clear it had a floating ulcer on its right eye,” explained Brannon. “This would require medicated drops four times daily to heal. [But] with the eagle being extremely strong and feisty, coupled with the stress factor, it was decided once, twice daily maximum.”

The key difference between this eagle and most of the birds that the sanctuary saw was that this one’s wings were still intact.

They had not been clipped or damaged, so when the eagle’s eye finally healed he could fly to freedom.

Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary
Source:
Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary

It only took a few days for the eagle to feel much better. When the team noticed that he was moving around normally, they brought him to a larger space to test his flying skills.

Then came the big news:

“It could fly well and was feeding well,” Brannon shared.

This bird would be able to return home after all.

The eagle stayed with the sanctuary for 10 days before he could finally fly free. Once he was returned to the location where he had been taken, the bird let out a big screech.

Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary
Source:
Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary

And he off! He wasted no time getting back to freedom, and we’re sure the rescuers were thrilled to witness this moment. After all, this is what they work for — to send animals back to their natural environment.

We’re so glad this eagle was freed and able to fly home. If you’d like to help Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary with their lifesaving work, consider donating to their organization.

If you’d like to see another one of Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary’s animal rescues, check out the video below!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

We are so excited to team up with @wildlifevets to assist us in the release of our animals! ✨Reposted from @wildlifevets Would you know a potto if you saw one?We ❤️ this video of a young female potto at @libassa_wildlife_sanctuary. She arrived at Libassa in Liberia as a tiny baby and had to be hand-reared. She’s now ready for release, but it’s vital to consider what diseases she might face upon her return to the wild, or might possibly introduce to other animals. The sanctuary has asked us for help with disease risk assessments for reintroductions of pottos and some of the other animals in their care, and we’re in the process of discussing the best way to support them. Other species at Libassa include pangolins, sea turtles, birds of prey and crocodiles. They are all victims of the pet and bushmeat trade. Pottos are slow-moving nocturnal primates which live in the rainforest canopy. They are currently classed as Near Threatened by the IUCN and are found across a wide range, stretching from Guinea and Liberia to Kenya and Uganda, and into the north of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Sign up to our newsletter – link in bio – to keep up to date with all of our projects and be part of the solution to the conservation puzzle. #FGF#TrainingVets #ControllingDisease #SavingSpecies#potto #primates #PrimatesOfInstagram #PrimatesAreNotPets#Libassa#PositiveConservation#WildlifeConservation#StoppingExtinction#WildlifeVet#WildlifeVets#WildlifeHeroes#actforwildlife#savingwildlifetogether2020

Posted by Libassa Wildlife Sanctuary – LiWiSa on Friday, August 13, 2021

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By Rachel Shapiro
hi@sbly.com
Rachel Shapiro is a contributing writing at Shareably. She is based in New York and can be reached at hi@shareably.net.
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